Nabana no Sato Illumination Park

Summary: Visiting the Nabano no Sato to see the brilliant display of nighttime lights, enjoy a wonderful meal, and the natural hot springs.

Our cousins in Nagoya took us on a day trip to Yatomi, about 30 kilometers southwest of Nagoya. Here we visited my aunt’s grave, met a distant cousin and toured his rice and produce warehouse, and enjoyed some tea.

Then our cousins drove us to Nabana no Sato  in Kuwana, just a couple of kilometers from Yatomi on an island in the Kiso river. There was some vague talk about flowers, and nighttime illumination. The area was known to my mother, who remembered her own parents talking about the hot springs in the area. I had hoped there might be a public bath (onsen). As was often the case, we just went along, eager to see whatever it was our hosts wanted to show us.

We arrived around 4:30 p.m. when the light was already fading. On the drive to this place we saw a large amusement park with roller coasters and rides, all shut down and closed for the winter. That is part of the Nagashima Resort, a sprawling complex of amusement rides, water slides, flower parks, outlet malls, and more. The Nabana no Sato flower park is just one part of this overall resort.

Along the walk to the entrance, the trees and bushes were covered with twinkling lights. We purchased our tickets and entered the park as the natural light gave way. Although there were some lights on, most of the park we could readily see was not. We were told to wait until 5:10pm, which was when the lights were to come on. That was just a few minutes’ wait.

 


And it was worth the wait. The bell tolled, and voila, thousands and millions of lights came on, to illuminate the flowers, plants, and trees as far as one could see.

Here is a video of the moment of illumination.

At first we mostly saw the tiny LED lights come on. In the distance, we could see trees in their autumn foliage illuminated by spotlights from below. We strolled through the park and marveled at the colorful display. Over the park sound system, Christmas music played. This was a little jarring to me because it was still only early November, and I had to chuckle a bit at the irony of hearing “Silent Night” broadcast over acres of park.

 


There were two long illuminated tunnels. The first was all white lights and about 100 meters long. People walked through, smiling and taking pictures of each other as they were mesmerized by the spectacle.

A second illuminated tunnel was lit by autumn-colored lights. These changed colors between red, gold, green, and orange. Walking through that tunnel was a little unsettling. When the whole tunnel would shift colors, I felt a slight vertigo.

Here’s a video of the autumn tunnel.

Examining the walls of lights closely, I saw the tiny individual LEDs were not changing color, but in each cluster of lights, there was a red, gold, green, and orange light. I concluded that my eyes and body were fooled into thinking my surroundings were moving whenever the lights changed, similar to the odd feeling one sometimes has in a stationary train or bus when a vehicle next to you pulls away and fools you into thinking you are moving backward.

 


At one spot there was a large panoramic wall of LEDs formed into a tight matrix. Synchronized with music, the wall presented changing visions of waterfalls in a lush jungle, southwest desert sunsets, penguins on an ice floe, and a nighttime scene illuminated by moonlight.

Here is a video of the panorama light show. Note that these are not projections, but actual images generated by a tight, coordinated matrix of multicolored LEDs.

 

In another area there were beautiful fall trees of gold, red, and orange, illuminated from below and reflecting mirror-like in pools of water beneath them.

A round, elevated observation deck towered over the park. From a distance, it looked like a small version of the Seattle Space Needle, but supported by a slanted pillar. It turned out to be a cantilever arm: As we walked through the park, we saw it rise slowly into the sky, then lower itself to the ground. I wanted to wait in line to take the ride up and see the view, but the weather was cold and our party a bit tired and hungry, so we passed that up.

 

 

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We stepped into a restaurant in the park and were happy for the warmth and the rest after so much walking. Dishes of noodles and tempura accompanied by wonderful tea warmed our stomachs.

Afterward, we walked over to the Sato no Yu natural hot spring baths. We separated by gender, disrobed, and showered, then enjoyed the many different pools, most of them outdoors. The water was plenty hot, and it soothed our muscles after the long day of sightseeing and walking.

After getting home, I found that illumination parks during winter have become popular in Japan and such displays have been established in many areas. I don’t know for sure, but Nabana no Sato may be the largest. It reportedly features more than 8 million LEDs. The Nabana no Sato illumination park is open from mid-October to early May. It is only 40 minutes by bus and 20 minutes by JR rail from Nagoya. I highly recommend a visit if you can make it.

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